Fish Post

Topsail September 26, 2013

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Eric Fowler with a gag grouper that bit a piece of Boston mackerel at some bottom structure just off New River Inlet while he was fishing with Capt. Joe Hifko of Rough and Ready Charters.

Eric Fowler with a gag grouper that bit a piece of Boston mackerel at some bottom structure just off New River Inlet while he was fishing with Capt. Joe Hifko of Rough and Ready Charters.

Doug, of East Coast Sports, reports that anglers are hooking big numbers of slot red drum right now in the inlets and surf. Shrimp, sand fleas, and live and cut mullet will all tempt bites from the reds.

Good numbers of sea mullet and pompano (along with a few big spot) are also feeding along the beachfront and biting bottom rigs for surf and pier anglers, with shrimp and bloodworms producing most of the action.

Plenty of bluefish are looking for meals along the beachfront as well, and they’re biting metal casting lures and a variety of baits. Casters are also hooking a few spanish mackerel from the beachfront and good numbers from the piers.

Boaters are getting in on the spanish and bluefish action as well, with most trolling Clarkspoons to hook up.

Along with the spaniards, there have been some big ladyfish feeding within a few miles of the beaches and biting a variety of lures.

Good numbers of bailer dolphin have been hooked within 15 miles of shore recently, but the bite seems to depend on finding the floating objects they school around.

A few king mackerel are in the same range and biting live and dead baits.

Bottom fishermen are reporting plenty of gag grouper action at bottom structure 10 miles and further offshore. Live and dead baits are fooling the gags as well.

Boats making the run to the Gulf Stream are finding wide-open wahoo fishing, with big numbers of bites while trolling ballyhoo and pulling baitless high-speed lures.

Inshore, anglers are hooking plenty of red drum in the inlets, creeks, and marshes. Live baits or topwater plugs, soft plastics, and other artificials are fooling the reds.

Donald and Capt. Russell Weaver with a 40 lb. wahoo that bit a ballyhoo under a blue/crystal Blue Water Candy JAG at the Swansboro Hole.

Donald and Capt. Russell Weaver with a 40 lb. wahoo that bit a ballyhoo under a blue/crystal Blue Water Candy JAG at the Swansboro Hole.

Speckled trout are still feeding in and off the New River, where they’ll pounce on the same offerings as the reds.

Flounder are looking for meals in many of the same places as the trout and reds, and around ICW structure like bridges and docks. Casting live baits or Gulps is the way to find the flounder.

Allen, of Breadman Ventures, reports that anglers are still seeing big numbers of red drum feeding in the marshes and bays off the New River and ICW. Casting topwater plugs, gold spoons, and soft plastic baits to fish that anglers spot has been the most productive way to connect with the reds lately, but blind-casting is also putting a bend in some rods.

A few speckled trout are falling for topwater plugs in the same areas.

Flounder (including some larger fish) are feeding in some of the same spots as the reds and in deeper water inshore. Soft plastics like TTF Trout Killers and Hustlers laced with Pro-Cure scents are tempting bites from the flatfish.

Richard, of Seaview Pier, reports that some spot, sea mullet, and pompano are taking an interest in bottom rigs baited with shrimp and bloodworms.

Plug casters are hooking bluefish and spanish mackerel on Gotchas and diamond jigs, with the fish feeding right in the surf zone on some recent days.

There’s plenty of bait in the water, and some king mackerel have been spotted near the pier, but none landed lately.

Bob, of Surf City Pier, reports that there’s been action with pompano, spot, and sea mullet for anglers bottom fishing with shrimp and bloodworms. The spot and sea mullet bite has been best at night.

Some bluefish are biting bottom rigs and Gotcha plugs, and casters are hooking spanish mackerel on diamond jigs.

Live-baiters landed a 33 lb. king mackerel from the end of the pier last week.

Cheryl, of Jolly Roger Pier, reports that bluefish and a few spanish mackerel are falling for Gotcha plugs and diamond jigs that anglers are working from the pier.

Bottom fishermen are finding some decent spot and sea mullet action, especially around dusk. Shrimp and bloodworms are fooling both.