Fish Post

Southport – October 27, 2016

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Jimmy, of Wildlife Bait and Tackle, reports that the big red drum are still off the beaches, and menhaden or cut mullet will tempt bites from the old fish.

The king bite has been decent off the beach as well, especially around the piers. Those looking for the fish a bit further out should check the hard bottom locations off the Lockwood Folly area.

Black and red drum are in the backwaters and creeks, along with a strong speckled trout showing for the start of the cooler weather. Use Gulp, mud minnows, and shrimp (there are still a few around) to target all three species.

Anglers have been connecting with nice-sized flounder, even though the water is dirty. The local flatfish have recently preferred Gulp, mud minnows, or peanut pogies and mullet (if you can find them).

Surf and pier anglers have been connecting with whiting, which are biting well, and a few spots. The area has yet to see the fall run of spots that is typical for this time of year.

Those heading out to the Gulf Stream can expect a strong blackfin tuna bite around the 100/400.

Andrew Imes, of Oak Island, with a 40” red landed on cut menhaden from his kayak fishing just off the beach.

Andrew Imes, of Oak Island, with a 40” red landed on cut menhaden from his kayak fishing just off the beach.

Angie, of Dutchman Creek Bait and Tackle, reports that most anglers are targeting citation red drum just off the beaches.

Trout have started showing up, and the best way to connect with them are on artificials.

A few anglers have had luck hooking flounder on live bait.

The king bite slowed down on the piers, and a few small spot runs have occurred.

Phil McBryde, of Charlotte, with a 19.5” flounder that was caught on cut mullet. He was fishing from the surf on Caswell Beach.

Phil McBryde, of Charlotte, with a 19.5” flounder that was caught on cut mullet. He was fishing from the surf on Caswell Beach.

Mark, of Angry Pelican Charters, reports that the water around the area is still dirty and very fresh, and it might take a week or so to clear up. The inshore action has been slow, but the trout are feeding on points and around the mouths of feeder creeks. Smaller reds are also working in the same areas in good numbers.

Bait in the backwater and along the beaches is starting to be a little easier to get on with some consistency. The red drum are feeding around these bait pods along the beach in very shallow water, with the bite spiking on the tide changes. Using 40 lb. fluorocarbon in front of 20-30 lb. braid is recommended when hooking these healthy fighters.

King mackerel are returning to the area in good numbers, but the better bite is still beyond the dirty water, roughly 10-15 miles offshore. Fishing clean water in the 50-70’ depth around ledges or structure should produce a bite.

Fred McMurray, of Gastonia, with a 41” red drum. The fish bit a finger mullet in the surf off Oak Island.

Fred McMurray, of Gastonia, with a 41” red drum. The fish bit a finger mullet in the surf off Oak Island.

Wally, of Oak Island Charters, reports that inshore anglers are connecting with large numbers of black drum, and they will take shrimp (cut, live, or frozen).

The big bulls are providing a lot of action to anglers in the surf and off the beach, and they should be targeted with menhaden.

Nice king mackerel (15-30 lbs.) can be caught trolling live menhaden 2-3 miles out.

Dennis Perkerson, of Seven Paths, with a 32” red drum caught off of Oak Island using a Lupton Rig baited with cut mullet.

Dennis Perkerson, of Seven Paths, with a 32” red drum caught off of Oak Island using a Lupton Rig baited with cut mullet.

Ryan, of Fugitive Charters, reports that the backwater is brown since the storm, but the trout bite has fired up. Use Gulp shrimp or small mullet to target the specks, and expect to hook some red and black drum in the process.

On the beach, the big red drum bite is on, and there are still some king mackerel being caught in the brown water.

There is a bigger concentration of the kings in 65’ of water or deeper.

 

Tommy, of Oak Island Pier, reports that the pier is open, repairs are finished, and the fishing in general is good.

 

Steve, of Ocean Crest Pier, reports that the fishing has been a little slow, but anglers still had luck hooking flounder, speckled trout, and black and red drum.

There was also a recent run of citation-sized reds and large king mackerel.